Indigenous Health & Cultural Competency (IH&CC)

The Indigenous Health and Cultural Competency (IH&CC) program consists of a series of culturally relevant education tools and resources designed for doctors and other healthcare workers to enhance culturally competent communication and overall care for Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other culturally and linguistically diverse patients in the emergency department.

ACEM acknowledges the Wurundjeri people of the Kulin Nation as the Traditional Owners of the land on which our offices are situated.

The IH&CC program was developed with funding from the Australian Department of Health.

Overview
Podcast
Series
Research
Methods
2015
Program
Promoting
IH&CC
Best of
Web EM
Supporting
Resources
Who are these
resources for?

The Indigenous Health and Cultural Competency eLearning series is a comprehensive course exploring key knowledge and skills in providing high quality care to Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other culturally diverse patients in the emergency department context.

Why learn about Indigenous Health and Cultural Competency?
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients are relatively over-represented in Australian emergency departments and suffer considerable health burdens greater than the general Australian population. Culturally competent care has been shown to improve clinical outcomes and improve equity of access and use of health services.

IHCC Promo video from ACEM Digital Media on Vimeo.


The Indigenous Health and Cultural Competency video podcast series complements the eLearning Module series and presents an exciting alternative learning approach to enhancing core knowledge and skills relating to IH&CC in the emergency department.

The podcast series can be viewed below or via ACEMs Vimeo account.

Podcast themes: Warning: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders are warned that these podcasts may contain images and voices of deceased persons.

FACEMs: By completing these resources your are contributing to your ACEM CPD requirements. To record this activity in your CPD Online record, search for ‘Indigenous Health’ in the ACEM Library. 
 

Case studies

 
Patient Centred Decision Making: A complex retrieval case

Learn how an Advanced Trainee improved patient outcomes by implementing a patient centred approach.  This podcast focuses on effective inter-cultural communication in a complex retrieval case.  Dr Zafar Smith explains how his enhanced knowledge as a result of undertaking the ACEM eLearning module series has proved to benefit patient understanding.

For a list of further reading resources on this topic click here

Patient Centred Decision Making: A complex retrieval case from ACEM Digital Media on Vimeo.

Health and Cultural Beliefs – A Torres Strait Island example

This podcast, by way of a case study and experiential discussion, explores some of the health and cultural beliefs within Torres Strait Island culture. This episode highlights some of the ways in which culture may influence patients’ experiences and perceptions of emergency medical care.

This episode features Mr Rob Timmings, Nurse educator and Remote Area Nurse, and Ms Sharon Mallie, ED Indigenous Health Liaison Officer.

Please note that this episode makes references to "black magic" which should respectfully be considered within the cultural and spiritual framework of Torres Strait Islander people.

For a list of further reading resources on this topic click here

Health and Cultural Beliefs - A Torres Strait Example from ACEM Digital Media on Vimeo.


 

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Cultural Competency Initiatives in the ED
Examples of cultural competency in the ED – Initiatives in Melbourne, Townsville and Alice Springs

This podcast helps viewers gain an understanding of how other emergency departments have implemented changes to their practices to enhance patient centred care for Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other culturally diverse patients.

Dr Rajesh Sehdev, FACEM, introduces the initiatives implemented at Townsville ED and how it has allowed their department to gain an understanding of the benefits to patients and staff by employing culturally competent practices. The podcast also features Emiliano Zucchi, Coordinator, Northern Health Transcultural and Language Services, Neil Pomfret, Senior Aboriginal Liaison Officer, Alice Springs Hospital and Sharon Mallie ED Indigenous Health Liaison Officer, Townsville Hospital who each reiterate the long term benefits such as enhanced communication with patients, increased compliance with treatments and ensuring better patient outcomes.

For a list of further reading resources on this topic click here

IHCC Podcast - Examples of Cultural Competency in the ED from ACEM Digital Media on Vimeo.

Enhancing timely care through cultural competency – Northern Health

This podcast explores the benefits of employing culturally competent methodologies in the Australian health system. The podcast uses the case study of Northern Health in Melbourne and how they have implemented changes to enhance patient centred care using Transcultural and Language Services. As a result these initiatives have seen a reduction in patient length of stay.

This episode features Dr Shyaman Menon, FACEM - Director of Emergency Medicine, Northern Health Vic and Emiliano Zucchi - Coordinator, Transcultural & Language Services Department, Northern Health Vic.

For a list of further reading resources on this topic click here

IH&CC Podcast Enhancing Timely Care Through Cultural Competency - Northern Health Vic from ACEM Digital Media on Vimeo.


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IH&CC Research and Initiatives

 
Understanding Māori Research Methodologies 

Cultural competency is as essential for health research as it is for clinical practice. This podcast explores innovative Māori research methodologies as utilised by the New Zealand Shorter Stays in the Emergency Department (NZ SSED) National Research Project team. In this episode co-principle investigators Linda Chalmers and Dr Peter Jones describe how the NZ SSED team incorporated many Māori research principles into the design of the project exploring the implementation and outcomes of the newly introduced 6 hour target rule.

Please access the further reading resources for the SSED website where the analysis of the impact of the 6 hour target rule on Māori and other ethnic groups will be published.

For a list of further reading resources on this topic click here

IH&CC Podcast Understanding Maori Research Methodologies from ACEM Digital Media on Vimeo.

Understanding Aboriginal Peoples' Experiences of ED Investigation for Chest Pain

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders suffer three times the rate of major coronary events, and yet have up to 40% lower rate of being investigated by angiography or undergoing angioplasty or stenting, resulting in an out-of-hospital death rate from coronary heart disease of 1.4 times the rate of non-Indigenous people.

In this podcast hear from Professor Anne-Maree Kelly and Dr Shyaman Menon who describe how a recent research project’s outcomes can help you better understand the barriers and enablers to follow-up care for Aboriginal people who come to the ED with chest pain.

The “Understanding Aboriginal People’s Experiences of Emergency Department Investigation for Chest Pain” project was developed as a partnership between the Victorian Department of Health’s Aboriginal Health Branch and the Emergency Care Improvement and Innovation Clinical Network (ECIICN) in late 2011.  

For a list of further reading resources on this topic click here

Understanding Aboriginal Peoples' Experiences of ED Investigation for Chest Pain from ACEM Digital Media on Vimeo.


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International Medical Graduates: A Diversity of Experience  
A diversity of experience: International Medical Graduates (IMGs) in emergency medicine: Part A Communication in the ED

In this episode a number of International Medical Graduates (IMGs) give their insights and experiences about navigating an Australian ED, in particular the culture of communication between staff, and what was new or challenging for them. Doctors will be able to learn some suggested means of communicating with colleagues of other culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds and in particular gain an appreciation for the needs of new IMGs.

This episode also features Dr Johannes Wenzel, an experienced FACEM, giving his expert reflections based on decades of experience as an IMG working in emergency medicine, and who has also worked with and mentored many IMGs.

For a list of further reading resources on this topic click here

International Medical Graduates in Emergency Medicine Part A - Communication in the ED from ACEM Digital Media on Vimeo.

A diversity of experience: International Medical Graduates (IMGs) in emergency medicine: Part B ED processes

In this episode a number of International Medical Graduates (IMGs) give their insights into the patient-doctor relationship in Australia and coming to terms with significantly different ED processes and systems.

In their experiences, they were required to adjust to Australian patients being more involved in the decision making process in particular.

Dr Wenzel again features, and each IMG gives their personal advice to new IMGs to help smooth their transition to work in Australia. The ‘Diversity of experience’ podcasts will benefit both IMGs and staff working alongside or supervising IMGs.

For a list of further reading resources on this topic click here

International Medical Graduates in Emergency Medicine - Part B Australian ED Processes from ACEM Digital Media on Vimeo.

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IH&CC Conference Presentation Podcasts  
ACEM 2013 Winter Symposium: "Working with Culture - Improving Patient Care"

This presentation explores three mini case studies that highlight key issues in IH&CC in the ED and showcased video footage that is included in the IH&CC e-learning module series

IHCC Winter Symposium Presentation 2013 from ACEM Digital Media on Vimeo.

ACEM 2013 ASM: What's the evidence base for Indigenous Health in Emergency Medicine

This presentation explores what we do and don't know about Indigenous patient experiences and outcomes in ED and is based on the literature review undertaken by ACEM's Indigenous Health and Cultural Competency project team to inform the suite of IH&CC education resources

ASM Presentation from ACEM Digital Media on Vimeo.

Leaders in Indigenous Medical Education (LIME) Network Connection V 2013: Training Emergency Medicine Specialists: A unique sphere of Indigenous Health and Culturally Competency

This presentation explores the educational methodology, rationale and development process for the IH&CC eLearning series

Leaders in Indigenous Medical Education Conference ACEM Presentation from ACEM Digital Media on Vimeo.


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There are significant gaps in the literature associated with Indigenous health in emergency medicine contexts. As a college who prides itself on scholarship as well as clinical practice, ACEM encourages our members to actively address this gap and to learn the skills required to undertake culturally appropriate research.

When undertaking research that involves Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and Māori patients, families and communities, it is important for researchers to build cultural values and approaches into their processes to ensure their research is informed by, and implemented in, the Indigenous communities with whom they work. These approaches are broadly referred to as Indigenous Research Methods and their use in both quantitative and qualitative research will ensure the development of valid research questions that are relevant to Indigenous patients.

Approved Subject for Trainee Research Requirement (regulation 4.10) Coursework Pathway

Trainees have the opportunity to study Indigenous research methods as one of their subjects for the completion of ACEM Regulation 4.10 - Trainee Research Requirement (Research Methods)

The following subject has been approved by the Trainee Research Committee:

Transformational Research for Māori Health
  • University of Auckland
  • Master of Public Health Subject: MAORIHTH 709
  • This subject provides a critical analysis of research and research processes with regard to their potential to colonise or liberate. Drawing on Kaupapa Māori Theory, the course examines how research can be undertaken in ways that are safe for Māori and that contribute to positive Māori development.

Suggested subjects for professional development

Members undertaking research with Indigenous communities are encouraged to explore the following subjects as options for professional development in Indigenous research methods.

Indigenous Health Research
  • Charles Darwin University
  • Master of Public Health subject: PHM525
  • This unit introduces an Indigenous research perspective, in which relationships - and accountability to those relationships - are fundamental. Students are introduced to the history and context of Indigenous health research and ethical and cross-cultural issues. Indigenous health research is explored, including Indigenous ways of knowing, and examining how research methodologies can be implemented so that the relationships between people, places and ideas are respected.

Kaupapa Māori Theory
  • University of Auckland
  • Master of Public Health subject: MAORIHTH 710
  • Kaupapa Māori Theory (KMT) underpins a range of approaches employed to ensure policy, research and intervention processes emphasise Māori ways of knowing and being and work to prevent the further marginalisation of Māori. Students learn about the development of KMT and its use in the context of Māori health and development. They experience and learn from a range of initiatives and projects that have KMT at their core.

Indigenous Health: from data to practice
  • University of Melbourne
  • Master of Public Health subject: POPH90232
  • This subject provides an overview of the scope of Indigenous health research, key institutions and data collections. It provides foundational understandings about Indigenous health ethics and values, ways to engage Indigenous people throughout the research process and strategies for the management of ethical, collaborative partnerships. It covers ways to develop a research agenda, choice of methodologies including decolonising approaches, capacity development and integrating research and primary health care information systems.

Aboriginal Health Research and Ethics
  • University of Western Australia
  • Master of Aboriginal Health - Thesis and Coursework subject: AHEA5801
  • This unit focuses on building relationships with Aboriginal organisations and individuals in order to begin to develop the research project proposal. Students develop their ability to explore and critique literature through student presentation and facilitation within seminars.  Students (1) have a detailed understanding of contemporary and historical Aboriginal health research policy in Australia, including the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Indigenous Health Road Map; (2) understand and apply various research methods and methodologies in Aboriginal health research, including qualitative approaches; (3) review and critique literature relating to Aboriginal health; (4) demonstrate sophisticated understanding of the development and application of Indigenous health research ethics; (5) begin building relationships with various Aboriginal community organisations, governments, institutions and individuals regarding research needs; and (6) develop a research project proposal that is used in AHEA5880/AHEA5881 Aboriginal Health Thesis (Research).

Learn more about Indigenous Research Methods

Principles of Kaupapa Māori PDF website
Values and Ethics: Guidelines for Ethical Conduct in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Research, National Health and Medical Research Council (Australia) PDF (excerpt of research methods) website (full guidelines)

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2015 Promoting Cultural Safety Program

Culturally safe emergency departments (EDs) are an essential component of providing high quality care for Indigenous and other culturally and linguistically diverse patients. Improving the ED experience of culturally diverse patient groups can contribute to improved patient outcomes and equity of health care provision.

ACEM has successfully been selected to deliver a ‘Promoting Cultural Safety Program (PCSP)’ during 2015 as part of the Rural Health Continuing Education Sub-Program (RHCE) Stream One.
 
The RHCE Program is an Australian Government initiative to support health care professionals in rural and remote Australia by increasing access to continuing professional development (CPD). RHCE Stream One aims to support, sustain and expand a high quality and appropriate medical specialist workforce for rural and remote Australia, with the ultimate goal of ensuring high quality and accessible specialist care for all Australians no matter where they live. For more information, visit www.ruralspecialist.org.au  

Click on the links below to read more about the Promoting Cultural Safety Program: What is the Promoting Cultural Safety Program?
The Promoting Cultural Safety Program (PCSP) aims to improve the ability of ACEM Fellows to assess and improve skills in Indigenous health and cultural competency within EDs.
 
The project aims to:
  • Lead to greater professionalisation of rural and remote staff in particular and provide essential support to senior staff at newly accredited specialist training posts in rural and remote EDs
  • Raise awareness of the need for improved cultural competency in patient care including the evidence base that shows this can lead to improved patient outcomes and greater satisfaction of ED care
  • Improve the ability of ACEM Fellows to assess skills in Indigenous health and cultural competency
  • Contribute to improved workforce satisfaction by improving patient-doctor interactions and assessor-trainee feedback and professional relationships
  • Build professional relationship with key allied health staff including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander interpreters and hospital liaison officers via the development process and by increasing referrals to these services as part of promoting cultural competency in patient care
 
The PCSP is planned as a six month program which involves eLearning modules, webinars, face-to-face workshops and online support for ACEM Fellows. The program covers cultural safety initiatives that are relevant for the ED, project management, change management, implementation of the new initiative, and monitoring and evaluation.
 
By participating in the PCSP, ACEM Fellows will be contributing a minimum of 30 hours towards their ACEM CPD requirements.
 
Who can participate in the PCSP?
The program is open to all ACEM Fellows. Indigenous Fellows are encouraged to apply.
 
In determining successful applicants we will seek a range of hospitals and geographical locations. Preference will be given to applicants who can demonstrate foundational knowledge in culture and health and that they have considered the issues that a cultural safety initiative could address in their workplace.
 
To ensure the initiatives of the PCSP participants have the appropriate support by hospital leadership, your DEM must be notified and approve of your participation prior to submitting an application.
 
You must be able to commit to all the program dates for workshops and other activities (see below). Please consider your existing commitments and workload prior to applying.
 
How can I apply to be involved?
Applications have now closed.
 
What is the time and workload commitment involved?
ACEM has accredited the PCSP for a minimum of 30 hours of CPD. There are mandatory activities as well as the work you need to undertake between activities in order to develop and implement your chosen initiative.
 
Formal activities – attendance mandatory
 
Pre-workshop activities (May – June):
  • Participants will be required to complete the 10 Indigenous Health and Cultural Competency online eLearning modules in their own time prior to attending the first workshop (30-60 minutes each)
  • Webinar: Tuesday 16 June, 14:00 - 15:00
  • Short pre-workshop survey
Workshop One:
  • Thursday 2 - Friday 3 July - Melbourne
Inter-workshop discussion forums (July – October):
  • Online involvement in discussion forums intermittently for support and further learning (a few hours per month)
Workshop Two:
  • Thursday 1 - Friday 2 October - Melbourne (Online)
Workshop Three:
  • Thursday 5 - Friday 6 November - Melbourne (Online)
Post-workshop activities (October – November):
  • Online involvement in discussion forums intermittently for support and further learning (a few hours per month)
  • Participant evaluation
Does it cost anything to be involved?
The program is jointly funded by RHCE, an initiative of the Australian Government Department of Health, and ACEM's Education Department. Workshops will be fully funded at no cost to participants.
 
What if I’m interested but can’t commit to the full program?
Attendance at all workshops and activities as listed above is a requirement of the program due to the commitment required to develop and successfully implement a cultural safety initiative.
 
If you cannot commit to the full program then you will be unable to participate. However, there are other resources available for you. 
  1. The Indigenous Health and Cultural Competency (IH&CC) eLearning module series and topical podcast series, accessible via the tabs on this website, are excellent resources for improving your skills and knowledge in caring for Indigenous and other culturally diverse patients. They will also assist you in identifying the key needs of your patient population and potential avenues for department-level change and advocacy.
  2. ACEM has created a series of online videos, which reflects the skills and knowledge covered in the 2014 Promoting Cultural Safety workshop program and will assist ACEM Fellows and other staff to implement initiatives in their own EDs. 
Who can I contact for more information?
For enquiries about the 2015 PCSP please contact ACEM Education: curriculum@acem.org.au
 
Acknowledgements:
ACEM’s 2015 Promoting Cultural Safety Program is supported by RHCE, a joint initiative of the Australian Government Department of Health and the Committee of Presidents of Medical Colleges.
 
ACEM is solely responsible for the content of, and views expressed in, any report and/or related Promoting Cultural Safety Program materials.
Improving the emergency department experience of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and other culturally diverse patient groups so that it is responsive and adaptive to their cultural needs can contribute to improved patient outcomes and equity of health care provision.

What is Cultural Safety?

In this video Dr Alyssa Vass, Project Manager of the ACEM Indigenous Health and Cultural Competency project, explores the concept of cultural safety and how it is essential for treating the "cultural emergencies" in our EDs. This presentation was part of the 2014 ASM "Resuscitating the Cultural Emergency:  Inspiring new initiatives for promoting cultural safety in your ED" session.


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Promoting Cultural Safety in your ED

Throughout 2014 ACEM supported five emergency departments - Cairns, Townsville, Darwin, Alice Springs and Joondalup Health Campus in Perth - to develop and implement an initiative within their department that supports improved care for diverse patient groups. At the 2014 ASM the Fellows which led the change each presented on their initiatives. Watch the videos below to be inspired for change that really does make a difference.

Joondalup Health Campus, WA - Dr Nicole Liesis, FACEM
This presentation explores Dr Nicole Liesis’ journey of discovery about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history and why it is important to understand this for improving patient care. She then outlines her cultural safety initiative which aims to make the Joondalup Health Campus ED in Perth an ED that integrates all aspects of their patients’ diversity into the health care they deliver.  As part of her initiative, Dr Liesis has established a passionate & collaborative group of staff who will educate themselves on cultural competency and drive change to achieve this vision.
Royal Darwin Hospital, NT - Dr Kerrie Jones, FACEM
Dr Kerrie Jones’ initiative aims to deliver a service for patients that acknowledges their cultural background and enhances their understanding of the care they experience at Royal Darwin Hospital ED. Dr Jones has developed a training and support program for medical and nursing staff to ask about patients’ cultural backgrounds and improve skills to establish a more productive rapport with Aboriginal and other culturally diverse patients. The program is successfully achieving its goals to make the ED a more welcoming environment and improve patient experiences and outcomes.
Video currently unavailable
Cairns Base Hospital, Qld - Dr Bill Wyndham, FACEM
Dr Bill Wyndham’s initiative focuses on implementing and maintaining a quality and flexible interpreter service in the ED that facilitates good health care delivery for all patients and staff. By educating medical and nursing staff in the ED as to the best practice processes for working with interpreters, this initiative is working towards improving the health outcomes for patients at Cairns hospital who speak English as a second language.
Townsville Hospital, Qld - Ms Shazza Mallie, ED Indigenous Health Liaison Officer and Dr Raj Sehdev, FACEM
Dr Rajesh Sehdev’s initiative strives to create an emergency care service at Townsville Hospital where Indigenous patients and their families and friends feel welcome, have easy access to the cultural support they desire, have consideration of their traditional health beliefs and are supported to navigate the Emergency Department. In this presentation, ED IHLO Ms Shazza Mallie described how the initiative focuses on the professionalisation of, and increased referral to, the ED Indigenous Health Liaison Service, a unique and highly valuable service that is improving the ED experiences and outcomes for Townsville Indigenous patients.
Alice Springs Hospital, NT - Dr Hilary Tyler, FACEM
Dr Hilary Tyler has established an Alice Springs ED Aboriginal Cultural Advisory Group which strengthens relationships between the emergency department, community health providers and the broader community. This Advisory Group will provide advice to the ED and is establishing a number of innovative initiatives in order to deliver high quality health care in the ED that is safe and culturally appropriate.

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Implementing Cultural Safety Initiatives

In the following video, Dr Alyssa Vass summarises the approaches to cultural safety as explored in the Fellow's ASM presentations and outlines what a culturally safe experience might look like for an Aboriginal patient.


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Resources

Powerpoint: Strategies for implementing change in your department 

A4 Tip Sheets - use as handouts to improve your staff members' cultural competency

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Indigenous Health and Cultural Competency resources for the Best of Web EM

Best of Web EM is a robust online referral mechanism and collation of educational materials and resources specific to emergency medicine and aligned to ACEM’s curriculum. A collection of IH&CC resources have been reviewed for inclusion on Best of Web EM.

We need you to review prospective IH&CC resources for Best of Web EM to ensure the best possible IH&CC resources are available for members, or; submit for review an IH&CC resource to potentially become available via the Best of Web EM educational resource.

The resources will be reviewed by FACEMs, trainees and others against criteria like educational merit and clinical accuracy. Submitted resources including academic papers, podcasts, videos and websites will be reviewed, evaluated and rated using Question Pro.

Nominate as an IH&CC reviewer or submit an IH&CC resource 

For more details on Best of Web EM.

Example IH&CC Reviews 

Image: web iconAustralian Indigenous Health Info Net
Website, free
Image: 3 star rating


Specialist Reviewer, IH&CC Project Reference Group, FACEM, NT
"I found this useful for cultural awareness and gave me more insight into indigenous health issues."

Reviewer 2, FACEM, VICImage: 4.5.5 star rating
"Great, broad, up to date, well researched resource specific to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health issues. Not focused on ED issues or approach however."

Target audience: All ACEM members
Curriculum domain: Medical Expertise and Health Advocacy 
Educational use: Teaching resource, Self-directed learning, Exam preparation (Fellowship)


Image: audio iconPain Management
Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA)
Podcast, free, 5 mins
Image: 4.5.5 star rating


Specialist Reviewer, Leaders in Indigenous Medical Education (LIME) Network, NSW
"This has some practical, clearly stated advice for challenging management."

Reviewer 2, FACEM, QLDImage: 3 star rating
"Snapshot of why taking a pain history and treating pain in Indigenous patients can be tricky. Specifically mentions Indigenous traditional healers and implications for treatment. Neat summary at the end." 

Target audience: All ACEM members
Curriculum domain: Communication and Health Advocacy 
Educational use: Teaching resource, Self-directed learning, Exam preparation (Fellowship)


Image: elearning iconRheumatic Heart Disease - Professional Development
RHD Australia, free (registration required),  E-learning Modules
Image: 3 star rating


IH&CC Specialist Reviewer, FACEM, QLD
"Comprehensive, engaging, focusing on patient journey, widely applicable as a learning resource to many different streams of clinical staff."

Area of concern:
To work through all modules of the resource would be too time consuming to hold the attention span of most ACEM members that I know. For the ACEM audience (trainees and FACEMs) should concentrate on:- i. Definition and cause of ARF and RHD, ii. High risk groups in Australian context, iii. Definition of prevention, iv. Importance of early hospitalisation to confirm diagnosis and start timely treatment. Module assessment tasks should then only concentrate on these areas.

Reviewer 2, FACEM, QLDImage: 3.4.3 star rating
"This eLearning module is beautifully produced, comprehensive and pitches to a broad range of health care workers. There are some inconsistencies in the information conveyed, and more advanced practitioners may be frustrated with the slow pace and stately delivery of information by narrated dot points."

Target audience: FACEMs and trainees
Curriculum domain: Medical Expertise and Health Advocacy 
Educational use: Teaching resource, Self-directed learning

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More Best of Web EM resources  
Contact the IH&CC team for more information

Network for Indigenous Cultural and Health Education


This website was developed as a joint project of the Australian specialist colleges and includes activities, resources & case studies for health professionals working in Indigenous health. There is also a members only discussion forum that you can register for to participate in confidential discussions about Indigenous health with your colleagues across the specialities.

Standards and Frameworks
 
Title Description Last updated Type (PDF/word) Size
IH&CC E-learning Modules Curriculum Framework Outlines the background,  purpose and detailed learning objectives of the online module series 10/2014 PDF 299KB
ACEM Statement on Cultural Competency This document provides a framework for the development and implementation of culturally competent practices in emergency medicine 08/2015 PDF  
Statement on the Health of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Māori peoples of Australia and New Zealand  This document is a statement relating to the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Māori peoples of Australia and New Zealand  1/03/2014 PDF 0.59
 
Further Learning Resources
These further learning resources are grouped to cover the topics explored in each of the e-learning module series. They include academic articles, websites and reports.

1. Introduction to Culturally Competent Care
2. Culturally Competent Communication
3. Health Beliefs and Health Literacy 
4. Impact of language diversity and working with Interpreters 
5. Improving ED access and experiences for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders
6. Collaborative Practice: Understanding the role of Aboriginal liaison officers and family in ED care
7. Culturally Competent Discharge Planning
8. Culturally Competent End of Life Care
9. A Culturally competent approach to Intoxication, Aggression, Victims of Violence and Self-harm
10. A Culturally competent approach to health issues of refugees and migrants in ED
The suite of IH&CC education resources are available and relevant to all ACEM members and will be of benefit for International Medical Graduates and anyone working in ED. As they are principle based they will also be relevant for many other health practitioners who work with culturally diverse patients.

Can I claim Continuing Professional Development (CPD) for these resources?
Fellows of ACEM:  By completing these resources you are contributing to your ACEM CPD requirements. To record this activity in your CPD Online record, search for ‘Indigenous Health’ in the ACEM Library. 
Fellows of ACRRM: Participants will need to submit the module completion certificates to pdp@acrrm.org.au to claim their points. Only the modules are accredited.
This online program is endorsed by Australian College of Nursing according to our Continuing Professional Development Endorsed Course Standards. It has been allocated 1 CPD hour(s) per module according to the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia – Continuing Professional Development Standard. Only the modules are accredited
This activity has been endorsed by the Australian Association of Social Workers until 30 November 2015. Only the modules are accredited
  Fellows of other colleges are encouraged to contact your CPD manager to ascertain whether they are accredited by your college.


These resources were developed by:


To ensure cultural appropriateness, accuracy and relevance of the IH&CC educational outputs, a diverse groups of experts from both within ACEM and external to ACEM were brought together to establish the project Reference Group throughout 2013-14.
 
The Reference Group had oversight of content development and processes and we thank them for their volunteer time and extensive expertise they contributed.
 
Reference Group Members:
Dr Elizabeth Mowatt, FACEM, Cairns
Dr Hilary Tyler, FACEM, Alice Springs
Dr Nicole Ghedina, FACEM, Perth
Dr Raymond Gadd, FACRRM, representative of Australian Indigenous Doctors Association (AIDA), Qld
Dr Khin Moe Sam, Advanced Trainee, International Medical Graduate rep, Melbourne
Dr Rachel Tullet, Trainee, International Medical Graduate rep, NZ
Dr Niall Small, FACEM, Townsville
Mr Jeremiah Baker, Former ED Aboriginal Liaison Officer, Darwin
Mr Neil Pomfret, Manager, Aboriginal Liaison Unit, Alice Springs
Ms Sharon Mallie, ED Indigenous Health Liaison Officer, Townsville
Dr Kerry Taylor, Senior Research Fellow Poche Centre for Indigenous Health, Flinders University NT
Dr Lilon Bandler, representative of The Leaders in Indigenous Medical Education (LIME) Network, Sydney
Mr Demos Krouskos, Director Centre Ethnicity, Culture and Health, Melbourne
 
Project Staff:
Dr Alyssa Vass, Project Manager - Indigenous Health and Cultural Competency
Ms Erin Flynn, Project Officer - Indigenous Health and Cultural Competency
Ms Natalie Johnson, Former Project Officer - Indigenous Health and Cultural Competency
Ms Sam Denny, Director National Programs
Ms Mary Lawson, Director of Education
Ms Holly Donaldson, Manager - Continuing Professional Development